Points and badges

For the past week or so, I have been working my way through Codecademy’s JavaScript tutorials. I can’t recommend them highly enough.

As things stand, I have a full house of 480 points and 35 badges and, as the Codecademy creators would undoubtedly hope, I am rather satisfied with the JavaScript proficiency I have attained. ‘Attained’ is probably the wrong word to use though. Being a self-taught Matlab hacker, I have found most of my coding know-how has translated fairly well into Javascript. A few concepts (recursion in particular) have presented me with some difficulty, but the overall experience has been more like learning a new coding dialect  than a new language altogether. I haven’t attained a proficiency, so much as uncovered a hidden one.

Which brings me to why I sought out Codecademy in the first place (thanks to @m_wall for the twitter-solicited tip-off) – I am preparing to teach Psychology undergrads how to code. From 2012/2013 onwards, my academic life is going to be a little more ‘balanced’. As well as the research, admin and small-group teaching I currently enjoy, I’m also going to be doing some large-group teaching. Although I have plenty to say to undergraduates on cognitive neuroscience and cognitive psychology, I think giving them some coding skills will actually be much more useful to most. As my experience with Codecademy has recently reinforced to me, coding basics are the fundamental building-blocks of programming in any language. They will hold you in good stead whatever dialect you end up speaking to your computer in. What’s more, they will hold you in good stead whatever you end up doing, as long as it involves a computer: coding is the most versatile of transferable skills to be imparting to psychology graduates who (rightly) believe they are leaving university with the most versatile of degrees.

With all this in mind, one of Codecademy’s limitations is the difficulty with which its students can translate their new-found JavaScript skills into useful ‘stuff’ implemented outside the Codecademy editor. As Audrey Watters points out, there is barely any acknowledgement within the Codecademy tutorials that the goal of all of these points and badges is to encourage you to write interactive web contact in an IDE. Indeed, last night when I thought about how I would use JavaScript to administer online  memory experiments, I had to do a lot more reading. This could all be about to change though. If the latest Code Year class on HTML is anything to go by, the folks at Codecademy are mindful of this limitation, and are attempting to remedy it.

It’s just a shame that the html integration has come so late in the Code Year (yes, I say this with full awareness that we’re only on week 13).  If the HTML-Javascript confluence had come a little further upstream, I think there probably would have been a fledgling memory experiment linked to from this blogpost!

Having experimented with prezi a fair amount recently, I’ve been looking at ways to showcase the output on this blog, hosted on wordpress.com.  Pasting the standard embed code into the ‘HTML editor’ just results in a garbled mess of html code being displayed on the blog post, so I searched for and found a way of doing this successfully.

The prezi community provides the answer below:
http://community.prezi.com/prezi/topics/how_to_embed_prezi_in_wordpress_com_blog

Here are the instructions from bookbagdesigner, posted in January 2011.


It can take a while to find the appropriate bit of the embed code described in step 2.  But once you’ve found it, steps 3 and 4 are straightforward and the results are a success.